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Selective neuronal staining in tardigrades and onychophorans provides insights into the evolution of segmental ganglia in panarthropods

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
13 tweeters
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
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Title
Selective neuronal staining in tardigrades and onychophorans provides insights into the evolution of segmental ganglia in panarthropods
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-230
Pubmed ID
Authors

Georg Mayer, Christine Martin, Jan Rüdiger, Susann Kauschke, Paul A Stevenson, Izabela Poprawa, Karin Hohberg, Ralph O Schill, Hans-Joachim Pflüger, Martin Schlegel

Abstract

Although molecular analyses have contributed to a better resolution of the animal tree of life, the phylogenetic position of tardigrades (water bears) is still controversial, as they have been united alternatively with nematodes, arthropods, onychophorans (velvet worms), or onychophorans plus arthropods. Depending on the hypothesis favoured, segmental ganglia in tardigrades and arthropods might either have evolved independently, or they might well be homologous, suggesting that they were either lost in onychophorans or are a synapomorphy of tardigrades and arthropods. To evaluate these alternatives, we analysed the organisation of the nervous system in three tardigrade species using antisera directed against tyrosinated and acetylated tubulin, the amine transmitter serotonin, and the invertebrate neuropeptides FMRFamide, allatostatin and perisulfakinin. In addition, we performed retrograde staining of nerves in the onychophoran Euperipatoides rowelli in order to compare the serial locations of motor neurons within the nervous system relative to the appendages they serve in arthropods, tardigrades and onychophorans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 5 4%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Colombia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 115 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 23%
Student > Bachelor 23 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 13%
Student > Master 12 9%
Professor 7 6%
Other 21 17%
Unknown 18 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 70 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 13%
Environmental Science 6 5%
Neuroscience 3 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 25 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 December 2021.
All research outputs
#1,161,666
of 21,775,893 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#226
of 2,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,196
of 208,675 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#9
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,775,893 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,675 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.