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The effect of physical activity on psychological distress, cortisol and obesity: results of the farming fit intervention program

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
227 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of physical activity on psychological distress, cortisol and obesity: results of the farming fit intervention program
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-1018
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan Brumby, Ananda Chandrasekara, Peter Kremer, Susan Torres, Scott McCoombe, Paul Lewandowski

Abstract

Rural and regional Australians have a higher likelihood of mental illness throughout their lifetime than people living in major cities, although the underlying reasons are not yet well defined. Additionally, rural populations experience more lifestyle associated co-morbidities including obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Research conducted by the National Centre for Farmer Health between 2004 and 2009 revealed a positive correlation between obesity and psychological distress among the farming community. Chronic stress is known to overstimulate the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and cortisol secretion which are associated with abdominal adiposity. Increasing physical activity may normalise cortisol secretion and thereby positively impact both physical and mental health. This paper assesses the effects of increasing physical activity on obesity, health behaviors and mental health in Victorian farming men and women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 227 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 220 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 42 19%
Student > Bachelor 35 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 14%
Researcher 25 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 6%
Other 31 14%
Unknown 49 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 21%
Psychology 35 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 12%
Social Sciences 19 8%
Sports and Recreations 15 7%
Other 26 11%
Unknown 58 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 December 2013.
All research outputs
#5,665,092
of 21,352,585 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,940
of 13,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,626
of 209,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#440
of 1,076 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,352,585 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,076 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.