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Seroprevalence of Bordetella pertussis antibodies in adults in Hungary: results of an epidemiological cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
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Title
Seroprevalence of Bordetella pertussis antibodies in adults in Hungary: results of an epidemiological cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2356-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Péter Torzsa, Raghavendra Devadiga, Monica Tafalla

Abstract

Pertussis (whooping cough) is well known to be underreported, particularly among adults, who can act as an infectious reservoir, potentially putting susceptible newborns at risk of serious illness. The purpose of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of pertussis in adults in Hungary. This epidemiological, cross-sectional study was conducted in adults in five general practitioners' practices in Hungary. Serum anti-pertussis toxin immunoglobulin G (anti-PT IgG) antibody levels were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sera were classified following manufacturer's instructions as: strongly indicative of current/recent infection (≥1.5 optical density [OD] units); indicative of current/recent infection (≥1.0 OD units); seropositive (>0.3 OD units); or seronegative (≤0.3 OD units). Logistic regression was performed to describe the associations between seroprevalence and various characteristics. Between 24(th) April 2014 and 24(th) April 2015, 1999 adults (60.6% female; mean age 47.4 ± 17.7 years) were included in the analysis. A total of 14.8% were seropositive for anti-PT IgG, 1.1% had a level indicative of current/recent infection, and 0.1% had a level strongly indicative of current/recent infection. Logistic regression showed significant relationships between increased rates of seropositivity and: age ≥60 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-2.80; p = .0002) or 18-29 years (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.13-2.46; p = .0094) vs. 45-59 years; former smoker (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.08-1.97; p = .014) or current smoker (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.01-1.89; p = .045) vs. never smoker; and male (OR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.01-1.68; p = .041) vs. female. Also, between increased rates of probable current/recent infection and current smoker (OR, 7.50; 95% CI, 2.32-24.31; p = .0008) or former smoker (OR, 4.07; 95% CI, 1.21-13.64; p = .023) vs. never smoker. Approximately 85% of the adults studied were seronegative and therefore susceptible to pertussis infection. Approximately 1% had anti-PT IgG levels indicative of current/recent pertussis infection, which could potentially be transmitted to susceptible young infants. Vaccination of adults is a key way to indirectly protect infants. Clinical Trials.gov NCT02014519 . Prospectively registered 12 December 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 8 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 9 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2017.
All research outputs
#8,431,950
of 9,665,907 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,651
of 4,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,850
of 262,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#92
of 132 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 4,114 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.