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Effectiveness of Progressive Resistive Exercise (PRE) in the context of HIV: systematic review and meta-analysis using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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8 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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54 Dimensions

Readers on

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197 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of Progressive Resistive Exercise (PRE) in the context of HIV: systematic review and meta-analysis using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2342-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelly K. O’Brien, Anne-Marie Tynan, Stephanie A. Nixon, Richard H. Glazier

Abstract

HIV is increasingly considered a chronic illness. More individuals are living longer and aging with the health-related consequences associated with HIV and multi-morbidity. Exercise is a self-management approach that can promote health for people aging with HIV. We examined the safety and effectiveness of progressive resistive exercise (PRE) interventions on immunological, virological, cardiorespiratory, strength, weight, body composition, and psychological outcomes in adults living with HIV. We conducted a systematic review using the Cochrane Collaboration protocol. Searching databases up to April 2013, we included randomized controlled trials that compared PRE with no exercise or another intervention performed at least three times per week for at least four weeks with adults living with HIV. Two reviewers independently determined study eligibility. We extracted data from included studies and assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Meta-analyses were conducted using random effects models with Review Manager (RevMan) computer software. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria (n = 764 participants at study completion); the majority of participants were men (77%) taking antiretroviral therapy (14/20 included studies). Exercise interventions included PRE alone (8 studies) or a combination of resistive and aerobic exercise (12 studies) ranging from 6 to 52 weeks in duration. Thirty-four meta-analyses were performed. Results demonstrated statistically significant improvements in cardiorespiratory status (maximum oxygen consumption, exercise time), strength (chest press, knee flexion), weight, and body composition (arm and thigh girth, leg muscle area) among exercisers versus non-exercisers. We found no significant differences in change in CD4 count and viral load. We were unable to perform meta-analyses for psychological outcomes however results from individual studies demonstrated improvements in health-related quality of life with exercisers compared with non-exercisers. Performing progressive resistive exercise (PRE) or a combination of resistive and aerobic exercise at least three times per week for at least six weeks is safe and can lead to improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, weight, and body composition for adults with HIV. Exercise may be considered a safe and beneficial for enhancing the health of medically stable adults aging with HIV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 197 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 197 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 39 20%
Student > Bachelor 26 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 10%
Researcher 15 8%
Student > Postgraduate 9 5%
Other 36 18%
Unknown 52 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 18%
Sports and Recreations 22 11%
Psychology 10 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 3%
Other 23 12%
Unknown 60 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#2,939,749
of 18,382,898 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#888
of 6,440 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,307
of 275,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,382,898 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,440 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them