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Trends in HPV cervical and seroprevalence and associations between oral and genital infection and serum antibodies in NHANES 2003–2012

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Trends in HPV cervical and seroprevalence and associations between oral and genital infection and serum antibodies in NHANES 2003–2012
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1314-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew F. Brouwer, Marisa C. Eisenberg, Thomas E. Carey, Rafael Meza

Abstract

HPV infects multiple sites in the epithelium, including the genitals and oral cavity. The relation between genital and oral infections and serum antibodies can help explain the natural history and epidemiology of HPV. We analyzed HPV data from NHANES derived from self-collected vaginal swabs (women ages 14-59, 2003-12), oral rinses (men and women 14-69, 2009-12), and serum (men and women 14-59, 2003-10). Type-concordance of cervicogenital and oral infections in women was found to vary widely by age. Prevalence of oral infections with type-concordant antibodies was low but varied by sex: 0.2 % (95 % CI 0.0-0.8) for women vs 0.8 % (95 % CI 0.4-1.3) for men. Vaccination was associated with a reduced risk of cervicogenital infection for vaccine genotypes among ages 14-17 (0.2 (95 % CI 0.1-0.8)) and 18-24 (0.2 (95 % CI 0.1-0.3). Seroprevalence trends in women showed a dramatic increase for recent birth cohorts, likely due to vaccination. By contrast, trends for men remained relatively constant. Age-specific cervicogenital prevalence showed a consistent peak in the late teens and twenties. Relative cervicogenital prevalence has largely been decreasing since the 1940-50 birth cohort. There are complex patterns in HPV prevalence trends and type-concordance across infection sites and serum antibodies. A multisite sampling scheme is needed to better understand the epidemiology and natural history of HPV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 17%
Other 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Unknown 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Mathematics 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,482,540
of 9,693,658 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,989
of 4,121 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,790
of 236,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#78
of 127 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,693,658 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,121 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,428 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 127 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.