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Multireceptor fingerprints in progressive supranuclear palsy

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, April 2017
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Title
Multireceptor fingerprints in progressive supranuclear palsy
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13195-017-0259-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wang Zheng Chiu, Laura Donker Kaat, Agnita J. W. Boon, Wouter Kamphorst, Axel Schleicher, Karl Zilles, John C. van Swieten, Nicola Palomero-Gallagher

Abstract

Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) with a frontal presentation, characterized by cognitive deficits and behavioral changes, has been recognized as an early clinical picture, distinct from the classical so-called Richardson and parkinsonism presentations. The midcingulate cortex is associated with executive and attention tasks and has consistently been found to be impaired in imaging studies of patients with PSP. The aim of the present study was to determine alterations in neurotransmission underlying the pathophysiology of PSP, as well as their significance for clinically identifiable PSP subgroups. In vitro receptor autoradiography was used to quantify densities of 20 different receptors in the caudate nucleus and midcingulate area 24' of patients with PSP (n = 16) and age- and sex-matched control subjects (n = 14). Densities of γ-aminobutyric acid type B, peripheral benzodiazepine, serotonin receptor type 2, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors were significantly higher in area 24' of patients with PSP, where tau impairment was stronger than in the caudate nucleus. Kainate and nicotinic cholinergic receptor densities were significantly lower, and adenosine receptor type 1 (A1) receptors significantly higher, in the caudate nucleus of patients with PSP. Receptor fingerprints also segregated PSP subgroups when clinical parameters such as occurrence of frontal presentation and tau pathology severity were taken into consideration. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that kainate and A1 receptors are altered in PSP and that clinically identifiable PSP subgroups differ at the neurochemical level. Numerous receptors were altered in the midcingulate cortex, further suggesting that it may prove to be a key region in PSP. Finally, we add to the evidence that nondopaminergic systems play a role in the pathophysiology of PSP, thus highlighting potential novel treatment strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 23%
Researcher 3 23%
Other 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 5 38%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 15%
Psychology 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Unknown 4 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,491,844
of 9,705,997 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#378
of 430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,911
of 261,971 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#10
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,705,997 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.4. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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