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Spatial distribution of G6PD deficiency variants across malaria-endemic regions

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
113 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
201 Mendeley
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Title
Spatial distribution of G6PD deficiency variants across malaria-endemic regions
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2013
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-12-418
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rosalind E Howes, Mewahyu Dewi, Frédéric B Piel, Wuelton M Monteiro, Katherine E Battle, Jane P Messina, Anavaj Sakuntabhai, Ari W Satyagraha, Thomas N Williams, J Kevin Baird, Simon I Hay

Abstract

Primaquine is essential for malaria control and elimination since it is the only available drug preventing multiple clinical attacks by relapses of Plasmodium vivax. It is also the only therapy against the sexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum infectious to mosquitoes, and is thus useful in preventing malaria transmission. However, the difficulties of diagnosing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd) greatly hinder primaquine's widespread use, as this common genetic disorder makes patients susceptible to potentially severe and fatal primaquine-induced haemolysis. The risk of such an outcome varies widely among G6PD gene variants.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 201 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 194 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 15%
Student > Bachelor 31 15%
Researcher 27 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 13%
Other 13 6%
Other 39 19%
Unknown 34 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 3%
Other 30 15%
Unknown 44 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,257,196
of 21,217,760 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,875
of 5,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,475
of 210,244 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#111
of 328 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,217,760 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,306 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,244 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 328 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.