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Xtreme Everest 2: unlocking the secrets of the Sherpa phenotype?

Overview of attention for article published in Extreme Physiology & Medicine, October 2013
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Xtreme Everest 2: unlocking the secrets of the Sherpa phenotype?
Published in
Extreme Physiology & Medicine, October 2013
DOI 10.1186/2046-7648-2-30
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel S Martin, Edward Gilbert-Kawai, Denny ZH Levett, Kay Mitchell, Rajendra Kumar BC, Michael G Mythen, Michael PW Grocott

Abstract

Xtreme Everest 2 (XE2) was part of an ongoing programme of field, laboratory and clinical research focused on human responses to hypoxaemia that was conducted by the Caudwell Xtreme Everest Hypoxia Research Consortium. The aim of XE2 was to characterise acclimatisation to environmental hypoxia during a standardised ascent to high altitude in order to identify biomarkers of adaptation and maladaptation. Ultimately, this may lead to novel diagnostic and treatment strategies for the pathophysiological hypoxaemia and cellular hypoxia observed in critically ill patients. XE2 was unique in comparing participants drawn from two distinct populations: native ancestral high-altitude dwellers (Sherpas) and native lowlanders. Experiments to study the microcirculation, mitochondrial function and the effect that nitric oxide metabolism may exert upon them were focal to the scientific profile. In addition, the genetic and epigenetic (methylation and histone modification) basis of observed differences in phenotype was explored. The biological samples and phenotypic metadata already collected during XE2 will be analysed as an independent study. Data generated will also contribute to (and be compared with) the bioresource obtained from our previous observational high-altitude study, Caudwell Xtreme Everest (2007).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 16%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 53%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Sports and Recreations 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2015.
All research outputs
#12,141,585
of 21,353,728 outputs
Outputs from Extreme Physiology & Medicine
#62
of 106 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,153
of 303,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Extreme Physiology & Medicine
#15
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,353,728 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 106 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.3. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.