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An evaluation of low volume high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) for health risk reduction in overweight and obese men

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
99 Mendeley
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Title
An evaluation of low volume high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) for health risk reduction in overweight and obese men
Published in
BMC Obesity, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0151-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin M. Kelly, Soteris Xenophontos, James A. King, Myra A. Nimmo

Abstract

Both sprint interval training (SIT) and high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) have been described as time-efficient strategies for inducing favourable metabolic and cardiorespiratory adaptations in healthy and diseased participants. To date, little attention has been given to profiling the potential health benefits of HIIT or modified HIIT training within overweight and obese cohorts with particular focus on inflammation. Within this pilot trial, we tested the hypothesis that 6 sessions of HIIT performed over 2 weeks with 1-2 days' rest would improve aerobic capacity, glucose metabolism and inflammatory profile in an overweight and obese male cohort. Additionally, we profiled the potential health benefits of 4 HIIT sessions performed over the same period. 18 overweight or obese males (BMI = 31.2 ± 3.6; V̇O2 = 30.3 ± 4.4 ml.kg.min(-1)) were studied before and 72 h after HIIT. Training sessions consisted of 10 x 1 min intervals at 90% HRpeak separated by 1 min recovery periods. Exercise was performed either 6 (group 1, n = 8) or 4 (group 2, n = 10) times over a 2 week period. After training no changes were detected from baseline for body composition, aerobic capacity, glucose metabolism or inflammatory profile (p > 0.05) in either group. Both 6 and 4 sessions of HIIT performed over a 2-week period are ineffective in improving selected health markers within an overweight and obese cohort. This trial reports data from human participants and was retrospectively registered on 22/02/2017 with the ISRCTN registry, trial number ISRCTN90672085.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 98 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 19 19%
Student > Master 17 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Researcher 5 5%
Other 20 20%
Unknown 25 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 37 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 28 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2020.
All research outputs
#9,486,734
of 17,805,015 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#96
of 183 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,393
of 274,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,805,015 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 183 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,691 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them