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Contraceptive service provider imposed restrictions to contraceptive access in Urban Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2017
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Title
Contraceptive service provider imposed restrictions to contraceptive access in Urban Nigeria
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2223-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hilary M. Schwandt, Ilene S. Speizer, Meghan Corroon

Abstract

Health service providers can restrict access to contraceptives through their own imposed biases about method appropriateness. In this study, provider biases toward contraceptive service provision among urban Nigerian providers was assessed. Health providers working in health facilities, as well as pharmacists and patent medical vendors (PMV), in Abuja, Benin City, Ibadan, Ilorin, Kaduna, and Zaria, were surveyed in 2011 concerning their self-reported biases in service provision based on age, parity, and marital status. Minimum age bias was the most common bias while minimum parity was the least common bias reported by providers. Condoms were consistently provided with the least amount of bias, followed by provision of emergency contraception (EC), pills, injectables, and IUDs. Experience of in-service training for health facility providers was associated with decreased prevalence of marital status bias for the pill, injectable, and IUD; however, training experience did not, or had the opposite effect on, pharmacists and PMV operator's reports of service provision bias. Provider imposed eligibility barriers in urban study sites in Nigeria were pervasive - the most prevalent restriction across method and provider type was minimum age. Given the large and growing adolescent population - interventions aimed at increasing supportive provision of contraceptives to youth in this context are urgently needed. The results show that the effect of in-service training on provider biases was limited. Future efforts to address provider biases in contraceptive service provision, among all provider types, must find creative ways to address this critical barrier to increased contraceptive use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 32%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 20%
Social Sciences 7 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,039,722
of 11,298,449 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,969
of 3,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,159
of 264,182 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#90
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,298,449 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,586 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.