↓ Skip to main content

Edible dormice (Glis glis) avoid areas with a high density of their preferred food plant - the European beech

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, April 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 512)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Edible dormice (Glis glis) avoid areas with a high density of their preferred food plant - the European beech
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12983-017-0206-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica S. Cornils, Franz Hoelzl, Birgit Rotter, Claudia Bieber, Thomas Ruf

Abstract

Numerous species, especially among rodents, are strongly affected by the availability of pulsed resources. The intermittent production of large seed crops in northern hemisphere tree species (e.g., beech Fagus spec.,oak Quercus spec., pine trees Pinus spec.) are prime examples of these resource pulses. Adult edible dormice are highly dependent on high energy seeds to maximize their reproductive output. For juvenile dormice the energy rich food is important to grow and fatten in a very short time period prior to hibernation. While these erratic, often large-scale synchronized mast events provide overabundant seed availability, a total lack of seed production can be observed in so-called mast failure years. We hypothesized that dormice either switch territories between mast and non-mast years, to maximize energy availability or select habitats in which alternative food sources are also available (e.g., fleshy fruits, cones). To analyze the habitat preferences of edible dormice we performed environmental niche factor analyses (ENFA) for 9 years of capture-recapture data. As expected, the animals mainly used areas with high canopy closure and vertical stratification, probably to avoid predation. Surprisingly, we found that dormice avoided areas with high beech tree density, but in contrast preferred areas with a relatively high proportion of coniferous trees. Conifer cones and leaves can be an alternative food source for edible dormice and are less variable in availability. Therefore, we conclude that edible dormice try to avoid areas with large fluctuations in food availability to be able to survive years without mast in their territory.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 22%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 6 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 41%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Unspecified 2 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Physics and Astronomy 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 8 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2017.
All research outputs
#252,463
of 14,332,570 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#20
of 512 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,660
of 265,367 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,332,570 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 512 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,367 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.