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Within-person associations of young adolescents’ physical activity across five primary locations: is there evidence of cross-location compensation?

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Within-person associations of young adolescents’ physical activity across five primary locations: is there evidence of cross-location compensation?
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0507-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jordan A. Carlson, Tarrah B. Mitchell, Brian E. Saelens, Vincent S. Staggs, Jacqueline Kerr, Lawrence D. Frank, Jasper Schipperijn, Terry L. Conway, Karen Glanz, Jim E. Chapman, Kelli L. Cain, James F. Sallis

Abstract

Youth are active in multiple locations, but it is unknown whether more physical activity in one location is associated with less in other locations. This cross-sectional study examines whether on days with more physical activity in a given location, relative to their typical activity in that location, youth had less activity in other locations (i.e., within-person associations/compensation). Participants were 528 adolescents, ages 12 to 16 (M = 14.12, SD = 1.44, 50% boys, 70% White non-Hispanic). Accelerometer and Global Positioning System devices were used to measure the proportion of time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in five locations: home, home neighborhood, school, school neighborhood, and other locations. Mixed-effects regression was used to examine within-person associations of MVPA across locations and moderators of these associations. Two of ten within-participant associations tested indicated small amounts of compensation, and one association indicated generalization across locations. Higher at-school MVPA (relative to the participant's average) was related to less at-home MVPA and other-location MVPA (Bs = -0.06 min/day). Higher home-neighborhood MVPA (relative to the participant's average) was related to more at-home MVPA (B = 0.07 min/day). Some models showed that compensation was more likely (or generalization less likely) in boys and non-whites or Hispanic youth. Consistent evidence of compensation across locations was not observed. A small amount of compensation was observed for school physical activity, suggesting that adolescents partially compensated for high amounts of school activity by being less active in other locations. Conversely, home-neighborhood physical activity appeared to carry over into the home, indicating a generalization effect. Overall these findings suggest that increasing physical activity in one location is unlikely to result in meaningful decreases in other locations. Supporting physical activity across multiple locations is critical to increasing overall physical activity in youth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 75 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 17%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 12%
Student > Master 8 11%
Professor 6 8%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 19 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 13%
Sports and Recreations 9 12%
Social Sciences 9 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 24 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2017.
All research outputs
#3,005,598
of 19,088,857 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,027
of 1,748 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,946
of 277,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#8
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,088,857 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,748 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.2. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,242 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.