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Oxidation of a non-phenolic lignin model compound by two Irpex lacteus manganese peroxidases: evidence for implication of carboxylate and radicals

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, April 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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1 patent

Citations

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33 Dimensions

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Oxidation of a non-phenolic lignin model compound by two Irpex lacteus manganese peroxidases: evidence for implication of carboxylate and radicals
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13068-017-0787-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xing Qin, Xianhua Sun, Huoqing Huang, Yingguo Bai, Yuan Wang, Huiying Luo, Bin Yao, Xiaoyu Zhang, Xiaoyun Su

Abstract

Manganese peroxidase is one of the Class II fungal peroxidases that are able to oxidize the low redox potential phenolic lignin compounds. For high redox potential non-phenolic lignin degradation, mediators such as GSH and unsaturated fatty acids are required in the reaction. However, it is not known whether carboxylic acids are a mediator for non-phenolic lignin degradation. The white rot fungus Irpex lacteus is one of the most potent fungi in degradation of lignocellulose and xenobiotics. Two manganese peroxidases (IlMnP1 and IlMnP2) from I. lacteus CD2 were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and successfully refolded from inclusion bodies. Both IlMnP1 and IlMnP2 oxidized the phenolic compounds efficiently. Surprisingly, they could degrade veratryl alcohol, a non-phenolic lignin compound, in a Mn(2+)-dependent fashion. Malonate or oxalate was found to be also essential in this degradation. The oxidation of non-phenolic lignin was further confirmed by analysis of the reaction products using LC-MS/MS. We proved that Mn(2+) and a certain carboxylate are indispensable in oxidation and that the radicals generated under this condition, specifically superoxide radical, are at least partially involved in lignin oxidative degradation. IlMnP1 and IlMnP2 can also efficiently decolorize dyes with different structures. We provide evidence that a carboxylic acid may mediate oxidation of non-phenolic lignin through the action of radicals. MnPs, but not LiP, VP, or DyP, are predominant peroxidases secreted by some white rot fungi such as I. lacteus and the selective lignocellulose degrader Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. Our finding will help understand how these fungi can utilize MnPs and an excreted organic acid, which is usually a normal metabolite, to efficiently degrade the non-phenolic lignin. The unique properties of IlMnP1 and IlMnP2 make them good candidates for exploring molecular mechanisms underlying non-phenolic lignin compounds oxidation by MnPs and for applications in lignocellulose degradation and environmental remediation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Unspecified 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 17%
Unspecified 5 12%
Environmental Science 4 10%
Chemistry 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 13 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2021.
All research outputs
#5,970,147
of 21,397,370 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#418
of 1,380 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,994
of 283,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,397,370 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,380 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,371 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.