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Pregnancy and Neonatal Diabetes Outcomes in Remote Australia (PANDORA) study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
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Title
Pregnancy and Neonatal Diabetes Outcomes in Remote Australia (PANDORA) study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-13-221
Pubmed ID
Authors

Louise J Maple-Brown, Alex Brown, I-Lynn Lee, Christine Connors, Jeremy Oats, Harold D McIntyre, Cherie Whitbread, Elizabeth Moore, Danielle Longmore, Glynis Dent, Sumaria Corpus, Marie Kirkwood, Stacey Svenson, Paula van Dokkum, Sridhar Chitturi, Sujatha Thomas, Sandra Eades, Monique Stone, Mark Harris, Chrissie Inglis, Karen Dempsey, Michelle Dowden, Michael Lynch, Jacqueline Boyle, Sue Sayers, Jonathan Shaw, Paul Zimmet, Kerin O’Dea

Abstract

Diabetes in pregnancy carries an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes for both the mother and foetus, but it also provides an excellent early opportunity for intervention in the life course for both mother and baby. In the context of the escalating epidemic of chronic diseases among Indigenous Australians, it is vital that this risk is reduced as early as possible in the life course of the individual. The aims of the PANDORA Study are to: (i) accurately assess rates of diabetes in pregnancy in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia, where 38% of babies are born to Indigenous mothers; (ii) assess demographic, clinical, biochemical, anthropometric, socioeconomic and early life development factors that may contribute to key maternal and neonatal birth outcomes associated with diabetes in pregnancy; and (iii) monitor relevant post-partum clinical outcomes for both the mothers and their babies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 106 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 19%
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 23 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 26 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2013.
All research outputs
#5,428,910
of 21,356,145 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,499
of 3,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,306
of 304,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#82
of 224 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,356,145 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,855 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 304,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 224 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.