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Scent of a break-up: phylogeography and reproductive trait divergences in the red-tailed bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
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Title
Scent of a break-up: phylogeography and reproductive trait divergences in the red-tailed bumblebee (Bombus lapidarius)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-263
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Lecocq, Simon Dellicour, Denis Michez, Patrick Lhomme, Maryse Vanderplanck, Irena Valterová, Jean-Yves Rasplus, Pierre Rasmont

Abstract

The Pleistocene climatic oscillations are considered as a major driving force of intraspecific divergence and speciation. During Ice Ages, populations isolated in allopatric glacial refugia can experience differentiation in reproductive traits through divergence in selection regimes. This phenomenon may lead to reproductive isolation and dramatically accentuates the consequences of the climatic oscillations on species. Alternatively, when reproductive isolation is incomplete and populations are expanding again, further mating between the formerly isolated populations can result in the formation of a hybrid zone, genetic introgression or reinforcement speciation through reproductive trait displacements. Therefore changes in reproductive traits driven by population movements during climatic oscillations can act as an important force in promoting pre-zygotic isolation. Notwithstanding, divergence of reproductive traits has not been approached in the context of climatic oscillations. Here we investigate the impact of population movements driven by climatic oscillations on a reproductive trait of a bumblebee species (Bombus lapidarius). We characterise the pattern of variation and differentiation across the species distribution (i) with five genes (nuclear and mitochondrial), and (ii) in the chemical composition of male marking secretions (MMS), a key trait for mate attraction in bumblebees.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 80 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 25%
Researcher 14 17%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Student > Master 9 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 7%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 62%
Environmental Science 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 18 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2019.
All research outputs
#4,030,133
of 20,815,952 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#948
of 2,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,814
of 300,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#57
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,815,952 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,885 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.