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Comprehensive and integrated district health systems strengthening: the Rwanda Population Health Implementation and Training (PHIT) Partnership

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
53 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
334 Mendeley
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Title
Comprehensive and integrated district health systems strengthening: the Rwanda Population Health Implementation and Training (PHIT) Partnership
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, May 2013
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-13-s2-s5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter C Drobac, Paulin Basinga, Jeanine Condo, Paul E Farmer, Karen E Finnegan, Jessie K Hamon, Cheryl Amoroso, Lisa R Hirschhorn, Jean Baptise Kakoma, Chunling Lu, Yusuf Murangwa, Megan Murray, Fidele Ngabo, Michael Rich, Dana Thomson, Agnes Binagwaho

Abstract

Nationally, health in Rwanda has been improving since 2000, with considerable improvement since 2005. Despite improvements, rural areas continue to lag behind urban sectors with regard to key health outcomes. Partners In Health (PIH) has been supporting the Rwanda Ministry of Health (MOH) in two rural districts in Rwanda since 2005. Since 2009, the MOH and PIH have spearheaded a health systems strengthening (HSS) intervention in these districts as part of the Rwanda Population Health Implementation and Training (PHIT) Partnership. The partnership is guided by the belief that HSS interventions should be comprehensive, integrated, responsive to local conditions, and address health care access, cost, and quality. The PHIT Partnership represents a collaboration between the MOH and PIH, with support from the National University of Rwanda School of Public Health, the National Institute of Statistics, Harvard Medical School, and Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 334 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Rwanda 3 <1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 319 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 80 24%
Researcher 51 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 13%
Student > Bachelor 34 10%
Student > Postgraduate 19 6%
Other 74 22%
Unknown 33 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 113 34%
Social Sciences 50 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 34 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 15 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 3%
Other 62 19%
Unknown 49 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2016.
All research outputs
#2,654,371
of 12,372,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,079
of 4,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,383
of 221,693 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#99
of 422 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,945 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,693 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 422 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.