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Tumor glycolysis as a target for cancer therapy: progress and prospects

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Cancer, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter
patent
4 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
517 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
370 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Tumor glycolysis as a target for cancer therapy: progress and prospects
Published in
Molecular Cancer, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1476-4598-12-152
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shanmugasundaram Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Jean-Francois H Geschwind

Abstract

Altered energy metabolism is a biochemical fingerprint of cancer cells that represents one of the "hallmarks of cancer". This metabolic phenotype is characterized by preferential dependence on glycolysis (the process of conversion of glucose into pyruvate followed by lactate production) for energy production in an oxygen-independent manner. Although glycolysis is less efficient than oxidative phosphorylation in the net yield of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), cancer cells adapt to this mathematical disadvantage by increased glucose up-take, which in turn facilitates a higher rate of glycolysis. Apart from providing cellular energy, the metabolic intermediates of glycolysis also play a pivotal role in macromolecular biosynthesis, thus conferring selective advantage to cancer cells under diminished nutrient supply. Accumulating data also indicate that intracellular ATP is a critical determinant of chemoresistance. Under hypoxic conditions where glycolysis remains the predominant energy producing pathway sensitizing cancer cells would require intracellular depletion of ATP by inhibition of glycolysis. Together, the oncogenic regulation of glycolysis and multifaceted roles of glycolytic components underscore the biological significance of tumor glycolysis. Thus targeting glycolysis remains attractive for therapeutic intervention. Several preclinical investigations have indeed demonstrated the effectiveness of this therapeutic approach thereby supporting its scientific rationale. Recent reviews have provided a wealth of information on the biochemical targets of glycolysis and their inhibitors. The objective of this review is to present the most recent research on the cancer-specific role of glycolytic enzymes including their non-glycolytic functions in order to explore the potential for therapeutic opportunities. Further, we discuss the translational potential of emerging drug candidates in light of technical advances in treatment modalities such as image-guided targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 370 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
United States 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Slovakia 1 <1%
Unknown 361 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 81 22%
Student > Bachelor 60 16%
Student > Master 55 15%
Researcher 45 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 20 5%
Other 57 15%
Unknown 52 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 96 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 88 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 39 11%
Chemistry 23 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 17 5%
Other 42 11%
Unknown 65 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2022.
All research outputs
#1,361,104
of 20,678,629 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Cancer
#51
of 1,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,412
of 298,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Cancer
#3
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,678,629 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,567 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.