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Using google street view for systematic observation of the built environment: analysis of spatio-temporal instability of imagery dates

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
65 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
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Title
Using google street view for systematic observation of the built environment: analysis of spatio-temporal instability of imagery dates
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1476-072x-12-53
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacqueline W Curtis, Andrew Curtis, Jennifer Mapes, Andrea B Szell, Adam Cinderich

Abstract

Recently, Google Street View (GSV) has been examined as a tool for remotely conducting systematic observation of the built environment. Studies have found it offers benefits over in-person audits, including efficiency, safety, cost, and the potential to expand built environment research to larger areas and more places globally. However, one limitation has been the lack of documentation on the date of imagery collection. In 2011, Google began placing a date stamp on images which now enables investigation of this concern. This study questions the spatio-temporal stability in the GSV date stamp. Specifically, is the imagery collected contemporaneously? If not, how frequently and where is imagery from different time periods woven together to represent environmental conditions in a particular place. Furthermore, how much continuity exists in imagery for a particular time period? Answering these questions will provide guidance on the use of GSV as a tool for built environment audits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Unknown 88 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 18%
Student > Master 16 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 7%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 12 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 20 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 11%
Psychology 6 7%
Engineering 6 7%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Other 23 26%
Unknown 20 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2014.
All research outputs
#1,128,726
of 5,032,959 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#88
of 306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,515
of 131,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#7
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,032,959 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 306 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,637 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.