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Preliminary results demonstrating the impact of Mediterranean diet on bone health

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
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9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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43 Dimensions

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Preliminary results demonstrating the impact of Mediterranean diet on bone health
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12967-017-1184-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Cristina Savanelli, Luigi Barrea, Paolo Emidio Macchia, Silvia Savastano, Andrea Falco, Andrea Renzullo, Elisabetta Scarano, Immacolata Cristina Nettore, Annamaria Colao, Carolina Di Somma

Abstract

Nutrition is an environmental factor affecting bone health. Nutrition is considered essential to achieve and maintain optimal bone mass. Mediterranean diet (MD) has shown to prevent bone disease. Aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between bone health status and adherence the MD. Four-hundred eighteen healthy people (105 males and 313 females, age 50 ± 14 years) were recruited in the outdoor hospital of the "Campus Salute Onlus" held in Piazza del Plebiscito in Naples, October 17-20th 2013 and 09-11th October 2014. All subjects underwent clinical assessment, calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) scanner and PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) questionnaire. Globally, prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia were 7.7 and 46.0%, respectively. The majority of subjects (60.5%) had an average score (score 6-9) of adherence to MD. The T-score showed positive correlation with PREDIMED score (r = 0.250, p < 0.001). The higher T-scores were positively associated with a higher consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), vegetables, fruits, legumes, and fish and negatively associated with consumption of red meat. The higher T-scores were positively associated with the highest odds of PREDIMED scores (higher adherence) (OR 6.91, IC 6.27-7.61, p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis models indicated that, among the single food items investigated, high T-score can be predicted by consumption of EVOO (p < 0.001), fish (p < 0.001) and fruit (p = 0.002) intake. A PREDIMED score of 3 was found to be predictive for a low T-score (α = 0.05, R-squared index = 0.417). The results demonstrate a positive correlation between bone health status and adherence to MD, suggesting that a high adherence to MD promotes bone health. The observations here reported confirmed that a specific dietary approach, such as MD, can represent a modifiable environmental factor for osteoporosis' prevention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Researcher 6 8%
Other 4 5%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 24 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 16 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 29 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2018.
All research outputs
#1,073,158
of 21,181,573 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#190
of 3,658 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,736
of 282,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,181,573 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,658 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,419 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them