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Effectiveness of the cardiac-diabetes transcare program: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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251 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of the cardiac-diabetes transcare program: protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, February 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2043-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chiung-Jung Wu, John J. Atherton, Richard J. MacIsaac, Mary Courtney, Anne M. Chang, David R. Thompson, Karam Kostner, Andrew I. MacIsaac, Michael d’Emden, Nick Graves, Steven M. McPhail

Abstract

This paper presents a protocol for a randomised controlled trial of the Cardiac-Diabetes Transcare program which is a transitional care, multi-modal self-management program for patients with acute coronary syndrome comorbid with type 2 diabetes. Prior research has indicated people hospitalised with dual cardiac and diabetes diagnoses are at an elevated risk of hospital readmissions, morbidity and mortality. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness (and cost-effectiveness) of a Cardiac-Diabetes Transcare intervention program on 6-month readmission rate in comparison to usual care. A two-armed, randomised controlled trial with blinded outcome assessment will be conducted to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of two modes of care, including a Usual Care Group and a Cardiac-Diabetes Transcare Intervention (in addition to usual care) Group. The primary outcome is 6-month readmission rate, although a range of secondary outcomes will be collected (including self-efficacy) at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 month reassessments. The intervention group will receive in-hospital education tailored for people recovering from an acute coronary syndrome-related hospital admission who have comorbid diabetes, and they will also receive home visits and telephone follow-up by a trained Research Nurse to reinforce and facilitate disease-management-related behaviour change. Both groups will receive usual care interventions offered or referred from participating hospital facilities. A sample size of 432 participants from participating hospitals in the Australian states of Queensland and Victoria will be recruited for 90% power based on the most conservative scenarios modelled for sample size estimates. The study outlined in this protocol will provide valuable insight into the effectiveness of a transitional care intervention targeted for people admitted to hospital with cardiac-related presentations commencing in the inpatient hospital setting and transition to the home environment. The purpose of theory-based intervention comprising face-to-face sessions and telephone follow up for patients with acute coronary syndrome and type 2 diabetes is to increase self-efficacy to enhance self-management behaviours and thus improve health outcomes and reduce hospital readmissions. This study has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry dated 16/12/2014: ACTRN12614001317684 .

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 251 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 251 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 44 18%
Student > Master 39 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 11%
Researcher 15 6%
Other 13 5%
Other 32 13%
Unknown 81 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 69 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 43 17%
Psychology 11 4%
Social Sciences 10 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 2%
Other 23 9%
Unknown 91 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,418,846
of 12,002,078 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,663
of 3,893 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,474
of 266,159 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#50
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,002,078 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,893 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,159 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.