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Leg elevation decreases the incidence of post-spinal hypotension in cesarean section: a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Anesthesiology, April 2017
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Title
Leg elevation decreases the incidence of post-spinal hypotension in cesarean section: a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Anesthesiology, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12871-017-0349-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ahmed Hasanin, Ahmed Aiyad, Ahmed Elsakka, Atef Kamel, Reham Fouad, Mohamed Osman, Ali Mokhtar, Sherin Refaat, Yasmin Hassabelnaby

Abstract

Maternal hypotension is a common complication after spinal anesthesia for cesarean section (CS). In this study we investigated the role of leg elevation (LE) as a method for prevention of post-spinal hypotension (PSH) for cesarean section. One hundred and fifty full term parturients scheduled for CS were included in the study. Patients were randomized into two groups: Group LE (leg elevation group, n = 75) and group C (Control group, n = 75). Spinal block was performed in sitting position after administration of 10 mL/Kg Ringer's lactate as fluid preload. After successful intrathecal injection of local anesthetic, Patients were positioned in the supine position. Leg elevation was performed for LE group directly after spinal anesthesia and maintained till skin incision. Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters (Arterial blood pressure and heart rate), intra-operative ephedrine consumption, incidence of PSH, and incidence of nausea and vomiting were reported. LE group showed lower incidence of PSH (34.7% Vs 58.7%, P = 0.005) compared to the control group. Arterial blood pressure was higher in the LE group compared to the control group in the first two readings after spinal block. Other readings showed comparable arterial blood pressure and heart rate values between both study groups; however, LE showed less ephedrine consumption (4.9 ± 7.8 mg Vs 10 ± 11 mg, P = 0.001). LE performed immediately after spinal block reduced the incidence of PSH in parturients undergoing CS. The study was registered at Pan African Clinical Trials Registry system on 5/10/2015 with trial number PACTR201510001295348 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Turkey 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Researcher 7 9%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Lecturer 4 5%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 27 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Engineering 2 3%
Unspecified 1 1%
Psychology 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 31 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,881,373
of 12,353,269 outputs
Outputs from BMC Anesthesiology
#465
of 694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,716
of 263,963 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Anesthesiology
#11
of 22 outputs
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