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Small forces that differ with prior motor experience can communicate movement goals during human-human physical interaction

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 607)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
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Title
Small forces that differ with prior motor experience can communicate movement goals during human-human physical interaction
Published in
Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, January 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12984-017-0217-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Sawers, Tapomayukh Bhattacharjee, J. Lucas McKay, Madeleine E. Hackney, Charles C. Kemp, Lena H. Ting

Abstract

Physical interactions between two people are ubiquitous in our daily lives, and an integral part of many forms of rehabilitation. However, few studies have investigated forces arising from physical interactions between humans during a cooperative motor task, particularly during overground movements. As such, the direction and magnitude of interaction forces between two human partners, how those forces are used to communicate movement goals, and whether they change with motor experience remains unknown. A better understanding of how cooperative physical interactions are achieved in healthy individuals of different skill levels is a first step toward understanding principles of physical interactions that could be applied to robotic devices for motor assistance and rehabilitation. Interaction forces between expert and novice partner dancers were recorded while performing a forward-backward partnered stepping task with assigned "leader" and "follower" roles. Their position was recorded using motion capture. The magnitude and direction of the interaction forces were analyzed and compared across groups (i.e. expert-expert, expert-novice, and novice-novice) and across movement phases (i.e. forward, backward, change of direction). All dyads were able to perform the partnered stepping task with some level of proficiency. Relatively small interaction forces (10-30N) were observed across all dyads, but were significantly larger among expert-expert dyads. Interaction forces were also found to be significantly different across movement phases. However, interaction force magnitude did not change as whole-body synchronization between partners improved across trials. Relatively small interaction forces may communicate movement goals (i.e. "what to do and when to do it") between human partners during cooperative physical interactions. Moreover, these small interactions forces vary with prior motor experience, and may act primarily as guiding cues that convey information about movement goals rather than providing physical assistance. This suggests that robots may be able to provide meaningful physical interactions for rehabilitation using relatively small force levels.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 21%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Master 10 13%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 30 38%
Neuroscience 8 10%
Computer Science 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 17 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 160. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2017.
All research outputs
#65,483
of 11,459,905 outputs
Outputs from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#4
of 607 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,905
of 264,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
#1
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,459,905 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 607 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,598 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.