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Does parental and adolescent participation in an e-health lifestyle modification intervention improve weight outcomes?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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160 Mendeley
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Title
Does parental and adolescent participation in an e-health lifestyle modification intervention improve weight outcomes?
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4220-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew W. Tu, Allison W. Watts, Jean-Pierre Chanoine, Constadina Panagiotopoulos, Josie Geller, Rollin Brant, Susan I. Barr, Louise Mâsse

Abstract

Few studies have evaluated the effect of adherence to a lifestyle intervention on adolescent health outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine whether adolescent and parental adherence to components of an e-health intervention resulted in change in adolescent body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) z-scores in a sample of overweight/obese adolescents. In total, 159 overweight/obese adolescents and their parents participated in an 8-month e-health lifestyle intervention. Each week, adolescents and their parents were asked to login to their respective website and to monitor their dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviours. We examined participation (percentage of webpages viewed [adolescents]; number of weeks logged in [parents]) and self-monitoring (number of weeks behaviors were tracked) rates. Linear mixed models and multiple regressions were used to examine change in adolescent BMI and WC z-scores and predictors of adolescent participation and self-monitoring, respectively. Adolescents and parents completed 28% and 23%, respectively, of the online component of the intervention. Higher adolescent participation rate was associated with a decrease in the slope of BMI z-score but not with change in WC z-score. No association was found between self-monitoring rate and change in adolescent BMI or WC z-scores. Parent participation was not found to moderate the relationship between adolescent participation and weight outcomes. Developing strategies for engaging and promoting supportive interactions between adolescents and parents are needed in the e-health context. Findings demonstrate that improving adolescents' adherence to e-health lifestyle intervention can effectively alter the weight trajectory of overweight/obese adolescents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 160 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 14%
Student > Bachelor 21 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 12%
Researcher 15 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 47 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 32 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 13%
Psychology 17 11%
Social Sciences 14 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 17 11%
Unknown 55 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,755,012
of 11,435,099 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,974
of 7,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,022
of 264,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#90
of 199 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,435,099 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,837 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,972 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 199 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.