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Empathy in Psychoanalysis and Medical Education - what can we learn from each other?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, May 2017
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Title
Empathy in Psychoanalysis and Medical Education - what can we learn from each other?
Published in
BMC Medical Education, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-017-0907-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henriette Löffler-Stastka, Felicitas Datz, Karoline Parth, Ingrid Preusche, Xenia Bukowski, Charles Seidman

Abstract

Several research areas, including medical education (ME), focus on empathy as an important topic in interpersonal relationships. This focus is central to the use of communication skills related to empathy and even more crucial to provide information in a way that makes patients feel more involved in the treatment process. Psychoanalysis (PA) provides its initial concept of empathy based on affective aspects including findings from neuroscience and brain research. Enhancing cooperation between ME and PA can help to integrate both aspects of empathy into a longitudinal training program. The condition of psychoanalytic empathy definitions is the understanding of unconscious processes. It is important to primarily attend especially the dominant affects towards the patient before interpreting his or her behaviour, since in explaining the emerging affects, the analyst has to empathize with the patient to understand the (unconscious) reasons for its behaviour. A strong consideration of nonverbal communication, clinical perceptions, intuitive interaction, contagion-like processes and their implementation and empowerment in medical and therapeutic curricula is one way of beneficially using interdisciplinary approaches to yield empathy in clinical interaction. Established methods of PA, like training of containment, reflective functioning, affective holding and giving meaningful interpretations in accordance with countertransferential and transferential aspects may help to put a focus on the clinican-patient-interaction and the preservation of the physicians' (mental) health. In consequence of the discussion of various training methods that take the theoretical and practical concepts of empathy into account, we aim for an implementation of the named methods in the medical curricula.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Postgraduate 7 10%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 6%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 22 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 23%
Psychology 8 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 24 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,560,843
of 10,152,716 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,177
of 1,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,846
of 263,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#31
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,152,716 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,254 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.