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Determinants of modern contraceptive use among sexually active men in Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, April 2017
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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265 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of modern contraceptive use among sexually active men in Kenya
Published in
Reproductive Health, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12978-017-0316-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rhoune Ochako, Marleen Temmerman, Mwende Mbondo, Ian Askew

Abstract

Research in Kenya has focussed on family planning from women's perspectives, with the aim of helping reduce the burden of unintended pregnancies. As such, the determinants of modern contraceptive use among sexually active women are well documented. However, the perspectives of men should be considered not only as women's partners, but also as individuals with distinct reproductive histories and desires of their own. This study seeks to understand the determinants of modern contraceptive use among sexually active men, by exploring factors that are correlated with modern contraceptive use. The data source is the nationally representative 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) of men aged 15-54 years. The analysis is restricted to 9,514 men who reported being sexually active in the past 12 months prior to the survey, as they were likely to report either doing something or not to avoid or delay pregnancy. We use bivariate and multinomial logistic regression to assess factors that influence modern contraceptive use among sexually active men. Findings from the bivariate and multinomial logistic regression indicate that region of residence, marital status, religion, wealth, interaction with a health care provider, fertility preference, number of sexual partners and access to media were all significantly associated with modern contraceptive use among sexually active men. Provider-client interaction as well as dissemination of information through mass media has the potential to increase knowledge and uptake of modern contraceptives. Similar efforts targeting segments of the population where contraceptive uptake is low are recommended.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 265 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 265 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 55 21%
Student > Bachelor 33 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 9%
Researcher 23 9%
Student > Postgraduate 14 5%
Other 31 12%
Unknown 85 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 58 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 47 18%
Social Sciences 35 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 3%
Psychology 6 2%
Other 20 8%
Unknown 91 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,996,844
of 13,278,410 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#672
of 875 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,019
of 263,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#15
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,278,410 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 875 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,239 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.