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Multiple strategy peer-taught evidence-based medicine course in a poor resource setting

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, May 2017
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Title
Multiple strategy peer-taught evidence-based medicine course in a poor resource setting
Published in
BMC Medical Education, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-017-0924-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ammar Sabouni, Yamama Bdaiwi, Saad L. Janoudi, Lubaba O. Namous, Tarek Turk, Mahmoud Alkhatib, Fatima Abbas, Ruba Zuhri Yafi

Abstract

Teaching Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is becoming a priority in the healthcare process. For undergraduates, it has been proved that integrating multiple strategies in teaching EBM yields better results than a single, short-duration strategy. However, there is a lack of evidence on applying EBM educational interventions in developing countries. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness of a multiple strategy peer-taught online course in improving EBM awareness and skills among medical students in two developing countries, Syria and Egypt. We conducted a prospective study with pre- and post- course assessment of 84 medical students in three universities, using the Berlin questionnaire and a set of self-reported questions which studied the students' EBM knowledge, attitude and competencies. The educational intervention was a peer-taught online course consisting of six sessions (90 min each) presented over six weeks, and integrated with assignments, group discussions, and two workshops. The mean score of pre- and post-course Berlin tests was 3.5 (95% CI: 2.94-4.06) and 5.5 (95% CI: 4.74-6.26) respectively, increasing by 2 marks (95% CI: 1.112-2.888; p-value <0.001), which indicates a statistically significant increase in students' EBM knowledge and skill, similar to a previous expert-taught face to face contact course. Self-reported confidences also increased significantly. However, our course did not have a major effect on students' attitudes toward EBM (1.9-10.8%; p-value: 0.12-0.99). In developing countries, multiple strategy peer-taught online courses may be an effective alternative to face to face expert-taught courses, especially in the short term.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Researcher 4 7%
Lecturer 4 7%
Other 15 25%
Unknown 16 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 36%
Psychology 4 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 17 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2017.
All research outputs
#8,514,644
of 9,787,859 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,341
of 1,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,426
of 263,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#42
of 49 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.