↓ Skip to main content

Addressing tobacco in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment settings: a cross-sectional survey of staff attitudes and perceived barriers

Overview of attention for article published in Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, May 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Addressing tobacco in Australian alcohol and other drug treatment settings: a cross-sectional survey of staff attitudes and perceived barriers
Published in
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13011-017-0106-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eliza Skelton, Flora Tzelepis, Anthony Shakeshaft, Ashleigh Guillaumier, Adrian Dunlop, Sam McCrabb, Kerrin Palazzi, Billie Bonevski

Abstract

Within alcohol and other drug (AOD) services, staff attitudes and beliefs are important influences determining provision of smoking cessation care. This study of AOD staff aimed to examine: a) current attitudes toward smoking cessation care; b) service and staff characteristics associated with unsupportive smoking cessation care attitudes, and c) perceived barriers to providing smoking cessation care. Between July-October 2014, 506 staff from 31 Australian AOD services completed an online cross-sectional survey which assessed agreement with 6 attitudinal statements (supportive and unsupportive) and 10 perceived barriers to smoking cessation care in the AOD setting. Logistic regressions examined service (sector) and staff (age, gender, smoking status and number of years in AOD field) characteristics associated with unsupportive smoking cessation care attitudes. A large proportion agreed with supportive statements: Smoking cessation care should be part of usual care (87%), smoking cessation care is as important as counselling about other drugs (72%) and staff have the organisational support to provide smoking cessation care (58%). Some respondents agreed with unsupportive statements: AOD clients are not interested in addressing their smoking (40%), increasing smoking restrictions would lead to client aggression (23%), smoking is a personal choice and it is not the service's role to interfere (16%). Respondents from non-government managed services, current tobacco smokers (compared to ex-smokers) and those with less AOD experience had higher odds of agreeing with unsupportive smoking cessation care statements. The most frequently identified barriers to providing smoking cessation care were: client inability to afford cessation medicines, insufficient funding and lack of a coordinated treatment approach (all 61%). Overall, staff hold largely supportive smoking cessation care attitudes but perceive a large number of barriers to providing smoking cessation care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 28%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Professor 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 11 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 17%
Psychology 6 17%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 14 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2017.
All research outputs
#6,102,251
of 19,459,575 outputs
Outputs from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#349
of 623 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,534
of 278,560 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,459,575 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 623 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,560 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them