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Increasing HIV testing among hard-to-reach groups: examination of RAPID, a community-based testing service in Queensland, Australia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
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Title
Increasing HIV testing among hard-to-reach groups: examination of RAPID, a community-based testing service in Queensland, Australia
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2249-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Allyson J. Mutch, Chi-Wai Lui, Judith Dean, Limin Mao, Jime Lemoire, Joseph Debattista, Chris Howard, Andrea Whittaker, Lisa Fitzgerald

Abstract

The success of 'treatment as prevention' (TasP) to control HIV relies on the uptake of testing across priority population groups. Innovative strategies including; rapid HIV testing (RHT) in community and outreach settings, engaging peer service providers, and not requiring disclosure of sexual history have been designed to increase access. This paper reports on the implementation of 'RAPID', a community-based testing program in Queensland, Australia that employs these strategies to increase access to testing. Service data, including client registration forms and a satisfaction survey from all clients attending RAPID between August 2014 and July 2015 were analysed. In 2014/2015 1,199 people attended RAPID to receive a free HIV test. The majority were urban-based gay men. 17.1% were first-time testers and 20.1% of participants were not eligible to access Medicare, Australia's universal health care scheme. RAPID's evidence-based strategies appear to facilitate access to HIV testing, particularly among those who have never tested before; however the implications for the ongoing treatment and care of people ineligible for Medicare, who test positive to HIV warrants careful consideration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 64 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 23%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 3 5%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 16 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 22%
Social Sciences 7 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 22 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2019.
All research outputs
#3,791,314
of 19,770,032 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,772
of 6,609 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,542
of 279,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,770,032 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,609 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,324 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them