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A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
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Title
A cross-sectional pilot study of the Scottish early development instrument: a tool for addressing inequality
Published in
BMC Public Health, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-1187
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa Marks Woolfson, Rosemary Geddes, Stephanie McNicol, Josephine N Booth, John Frank

Abstract

Early childhood is recognised as a key developmental phase with implications for social, academic, health and wellbeing outcomes in later childhood and indeed throughout the adult lifespan. Community level data on inequalities in early child development are therefore required to establish the impact of government early years' policies and programmes on children's strengths and vulnerabilities at local and national level. This would allow local leaders to target tailored interventions according to community needs to improve children's readiness for the transition to school. The challenge is collecting valid data on sufficient samples of children entering school to derive robust inferences about each local birth cohort's developmental status. This information needs to be presented in a way that allows community stakeholders to understand the results, expediting the improvement of preschool programming to improve future cohorts' development in the early years. The aim of the study was to carry out a pilot to test the feasibility and ease of use in Scotland of the 104-item teacher-administered Early Development Instrument, an internationally validated measure of children's global development at school entry developed in Canada.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 83 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 31%
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Unspecified 4 5%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 39%
Social Sciences 11 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Unspecified 4 5%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 20 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2018.
All research outputs
#4,449,402
of 18,013,534 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,433
of 12,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,146
of 276,035 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#388
of 1,086 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,013,534 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,125 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,035 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,086 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.