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Effects of dietary physical or nutritional factors on morphology of rumen papillae and transcriptome changes in lactating dairy cows based on three different forage-based diets

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2017
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Title
Effects of dietary physical or nutritional factors on morphology of rumen papillae and transcriptome changes in lactating dairy cows based on three different forage-based diets
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-3726-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bing Wang, Diming Wang, Xuehui Wu, Jie Cai, Mei Liu, Xinbei Huang, Jiusheng Wu, Jianxin Liu, Leluo Guan

Abstract

Rumen epithelial tissue plays an important role in nutrient absorption and rumen health. However, whether forage quality and particle size impact the rumen epithelial morphology is unclear. The current study was conducted to elucidate the effects of forage quality and forage particle size on rumen epithelial morphology and to identify potential underlying molecular mechanisms by analyzing the transcriptome of the rumen epithelium (RE). To achieve these objectives, 18 mid-lactation dairy cows were allocated to three groups (6 cows per group), and were fed with one of three different forage-based diets, alfalfa hay (AH), corn stover (CS), and rice straw (RS) for 14 weeks, respectively. Ruminal volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and epithelial thickness were determined, and RNA-sequencing was conducted to identify the transcriptomic changes of rumen epithelial under different forage-based diets. The RS diet exhibited greater particle size but low quality, the AH diet was high nutritional value but small particle size, and CS diet was low quality and small particle size. The ruminal total VFA concentration was greater in AH compared with those in CS or RS. The width of the rumen papillae was greater in RS-fed cows than in cows fed AH or CS. In total, 31, 40, and 28 differentially expressed (DE, fold change > 2, FDR < 0.05) genes were identified via pair-wise comparisons including AH vs. CS, AH vs. RS, and RS vs. CS, respectively. Functional classification analysis of DE genes revealed dynamic changes in ion binding (such as DSG1) between AH and CS, proliferation and apoptotic processes (such as BAG3, HLA-DQA1, and UGT2B17) and complement activation (such as C7) between AH or RS and CS. The expression of HLA-DQA1 was down-regulated in RS compared with AH and CS, and the expression of UGT2B17 was down-regulated in RS compared with CS, with positive (R = 0.94) and negative (R = -0.96) correlation with the width of rumen epithelial papillae (P < 0.05), respectively. Our results suggest that both nutrients (VFAs) and particle sizes can alter expression of genes involved in cell proliferation/apoptosis process and complement complex. Our results suggest that particle size may be more important in regulating rumen epithelial morphology when animals are fed with low-quality forage diets and the identified DE genes may affect the RE nutrient absorption or morphology of RE. Our findings provide insights into the effects of the dietary particle size in the future management of dairy cow feeding, that when cows were fed with low-quality forage (such as rice straw), smaller particle size may be beneficial for nutrients absorption and milk production.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 15 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 40%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 16 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2017.
All research outputs
#8,519,001
of 9,792,785 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#5,909
of 6,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,876
of 264,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#72
of 79 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 6,679 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.