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Quantifying capture stress in free ranging European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, May 2017
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Title
Quantifying capture stress in free ranging European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus)
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-1045-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nikolaus Huber, Sebastian G. Vetter, Alina L. Evans, Petter Kjellander, Susanne Küker, Ulrika A. Bergvall, Jon M. Arnemo

Abstract

To understand and reduce the concomitant effects of trapping and handling procedures in wildlife species, it is essential to measure their physiological impact. Here, we examined individual variation in stress levels in non-anesthetized European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), which were captured in box traps and physically restrained for tagging, biometrics and bio-sampling. In winter 2013, we collected venous blood samples from 28 individuals during 28 capture events and evaluated standard measurements for stress (heart rate, body temperature, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, lactate and total cortisol). Additionally, we assessed stress using the immunological tool, Leukocyte Coping Capacity (LCC), a real-time proxy for stress measuring oxygen radical production by leukocytes. Finally, the behavioral response to handling was recorded using a scoring system. LCC and therefore stress levels were negatively influenced by the time animals spent in the box trap with human presence at the capture site prior to handling. In contrast, none of the classical stress measures, including total cortisol, nor the behavioral assessment, were correlated with the stressor tested (time of human presence prior to handling) and thus did not provide a clear depiction regarding the extent of the animals short-term stress response. Overall our study verifies the LCC as a strong method to quantify short-term stress reactions in wildlife. Moreover, our results clearly show that human presence at the trapping site prior to handling should be kept to an absolute minimum in order to reduce stress levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Researcher 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Other 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 38%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 11 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,560,855
of 10,152,716 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#852
of 1,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,475
of 264,184 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#64
of 79 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,152,716 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,509 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,184 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 79 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.