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Patterns of divergence in fish species separated by the Isthmus of Panama

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

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1 blog
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10 tweeters

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85 Mendeley
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Title
Patterns of divergence in fish species separated by the Isthmus of Panama
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-0957-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine E. Thacker

Abstract

The Pleistocene closure of Isthmus of Panama, separating the basins of the Eastern Pacific and the Caribbean Sea, created a unique natural experiment that reveals how marine faunas respond to environmental change. To explore how fishes have been affected by this tectonic event, I compare transisthmian patterns in phylogeny and morphology for geminate lineages in two families, Eleotridae (sleepers) and Apogonidae (cardinalfishes). Time-calibrated phylogenies for these families show different diversification patterns. In Eleotridae, several independent shallow instances of transisthmian divergences occur, with one or a few species on either side of the Isthmus. Among Apogonidae, a single clade of Eastern Pacific species is nested within a broad Caribbean radiation that also includes a species known from the Mediterranean. Divergence time estimates for taxa isolated by closure of the Isthmus are broadly congruent. Hypotheses dated with deeper, fossil-based legacy calibrations put the divergences in the Miocene at 7.4-15.1 Ma, while those estimated with a shallow biogeographic calibration of final Isthmus closure range from 5.1 to 9.9 Ma, in the late Miocene/early Pliocene. Eleotridae are more euryhaline than Apogonidae, but do not exhibit shallower transisthmian divergences. In both families, descendent lineages on either side of the Isthmus of Panama exhibit significant shape differences, although that distinction disappears for Apogonidae when I apply a correction for phylogenetic relationships. To evaluate the tempo and mode of continuous character evolution, I fit several single and multiple rate evolutionary models to morphometric data reconstructed on the Apogonidae phylogeny. I find that the most highly favored model, as estimated on both legacy and isthmus calibrated hypotheses, is a multiple rate Ornstein-Uhlbeck model, with a mosaic of rate shifts postulated for shape changes among fishes in the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific. Although many transisthmian taxa have been compared and their phylogenies calibrated to estimate the dates associated with population sundering, few studies correlate these timing estimates with morphological change. I show that in transisthmian fish lineages, morphometric distinctions are detectable across the Isthmus, and that rates and patterns of shape change have also shifted, with variable manifestations across the body and between the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Unknown 83 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 20%
Student > Bachelor 16 19%
Researcher 15 18%
Student > Master 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 48%
Environmental Science 8 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,580,608
of 22,971,207 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#581
of 2,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,326
of 310,791 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#21
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,971,207 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,915 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,791 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.