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Maternal infection and risk of intrapartum death: a population based observational study in South Asia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal infection and risk of intrapartum death: a population based observational study in South Asia
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-13-245
Pubmed ID
Authors

Azusa Iwamoto, Nadine Seward, Audrey Prost, Matthew Ellis, Andrew Copas, Edward Fottrell, Kishwar Azad, Prasanta Tripathy, Anthony Costello

Abstract

Approximately 1.2 million stillbirths occur in the intrapartum period, and a further 717,000 annual neonatal deaths are caused by intrapartum events, most of which occur in resource poor settings. We aim to test the 'double-hit' hypothesis that maternal infection in the perinatal period predisposes to neurodevelopmental sequelae from an intrapartum asphyxia insult, increasing the likelihood of an early neonatal death compared with asphyxia alone. This is an observational study of singleton newborn infants with signs of intrapartum asphyxia that uses data from three previously conducted cluster randomized controlled trials taking place in rural Bangladesh and India.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 28%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 16 19%
Unknown 9 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 47%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 20%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 9 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 February 2014.
All research outputs
#1,498,322
of 16,006,146 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#415
of 2,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,519
of 267,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#28
of 225 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,006,146 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,946 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,527 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 225 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.