↓ Skip to main content

Contraception for adolescents in low and middle income countries: needs, barriers, and access

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, January 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
3 policy sources
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
284 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
776 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Contraception for adolescents in low and middle income countries: needs, barriers, and access
Published in
Reproductive Health, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1742-4755-11-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Venkatraman Chandra-Mouli, Donna R McCarraher, Sharon J Phillips, Nancy E Williamson, Gwyn Hainsworth

Abstract

Substantial numbers of adolescents experience the negative health consequences of early, unprotected sexual activity - unintended pregnancy, unsafe abortions, pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity and Sexually Transmitted Infections including Human Immunodeficiency Virus; as well as its social and economic costs. Improving access to and use of contraceptives - including condoms - needs to be a key component of an overall strategy to preventing these problems. This paper contains a review of research evidence and programmatic experiences on needs, barriers, and approaches to access and use of contraception by adolescents in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Although the sexual activity of adolescents (ages 10-19) varies markedly for boys versus girls and by region, a significant number of adolescents are sexually active; and this increases steadily from mid-to-late adolescence. Sexually active adolescents - both married and unmarried - need contraception. All adolescents in LMIC - especially unmarried ones - face a number of barriers in obtaining contraception and in using them correctly and consistently. Effective interventions to improve access and use of contraception include enacting and implementing laws and policies requiring the provision of sexuality education and contraceptive services for adolescents; building community support for the provision of contraception to adolescents, providing sexuality education within and outside school settings, and increasing the access to and use of contraception by making health services adolescent-friendly, integrating contraceptive services with other health services, and providing contraception through a variety of outlets. Emerging data suggest mobile phones and social media are promising means of increasing contraceptive use among adolescents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 776 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Egypt 1 <1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 <1%
Rwanda 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 763 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 223 29%
Student > Bachelor 99 13%
Researcher 93 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 66 9%
Student > Postgraduate 64 8%
Other 111 14%
Unknown 120 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 233 30%
Social Sciences 143 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 141 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 2%
Psychology 17 2%
Other 83 11%
Unknown 141 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2020.
All research outputs
#1,302,122
of 17,805,015 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#122
of 1,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,060
of 275,867 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#5
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,805,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,151 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,867 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.