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Sex differences in rat placental development: from pre-implantation to late gestation

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, May 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 Facebook page

Citations

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29 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Sex differences in rat placental development: from pre-implantation to late gestation
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13293-017-0138-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. I. Kalisch-Smith, D. G. Simmons, M. Pantaleon, K. M. Moritz

Abstract

A male fetus is suggested to be more susceptible to in utero and birth complications. This may be due in part to altered morphology or function of the XY placenta. We hypothesised that sexual dimorphism begins at the blastocyst stage with sex differences in the progenitor trophectoderm (TE) and its derived trophoblast lineages, as these cells populate the majority of cell types within the placenta. We investigated sex-specific differences in cell allocation in the pre-implantation embryo and further characterised growth and gene expression of the placental compartments from the early stages of the definitive placenta through to late gestation. Naturally mated Sprague Dawley dams were used to collect blastocysts at embryonic day (E) 5 to characterise cell allocation; total, TE, and inner cell mass (ICM), and differentiation to downstream trophoblast cell types. Placental tissues were collected at E13, E15, and E20 to characterise volumes of placental compartments, and sex-specific gene expression profiles. Pre-implantation embryos showed no sex differences in cell allocation (total, TE and ICM) or early trophoblast differentiation, assessed by outgrowth area, number and ploidy of trophoblasts and P-TGCs, and expression of markers of trophoblast stem cell state or differentiation. Whilst no changes in placental structures were found in the immature E13 placenta, the definitive E15 placenta from female fetuses had reduced labyrinthine volume, fetal and maternal blood space volume, as well as fetal blood space surface area, when compared to placentas from males. No differences between the sexes in labyrinth trophoblast volume or interhaemal membrane thickness were found. By E20 these sex-specific placental differences were no longer present, but female fetuses weighed less than their male counterparts. Coupled with expression profiles from E13 and E15 placental samples may suggest a developmental delay in placental differentiation. Although there were no overt differences in blastocyst cell number or early placental development, reduced growth of the female labyrinth in mid gestation is likely to contribute to lower fetal weight in females at E20. These data suggest sex differences in fetal growth trajectories are due at least in part, to differences in placenta growth.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 28%
Researcher 12 26%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Student > Master 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,551,593
of 11,707,803 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#125
of 193 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,632
of 267,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#7
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,707,803 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 193 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.