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Nutrition practices and knowledge among NCAA Division III football players

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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17 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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221 Mendeley
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Title
Nutrition practices and knowledge among NCAA Division III football players
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
DOI 10.1186/s12970-017-0170-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth Lea Abbey, Cynthia Joy Wright, Christina M. Kirkpatrick

Abstract

Participation in collegiate American football is physically demanding and may have long-term health implications, particularly in relation to cardiovascular and neurological health. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III (DIII) football players are a relatively unstudied population, particularly in terms of their dietary habits and knowledge. The aim of the present study was to descriptively evaluate the dietary intake of DIII football players including a subset of linemen and assess the nutritional knowledge and sources of information of these athletes. The study sample was 88 DIII football players including a subset of nine linemen. All participants completed a food frequency questionnaire, and a nutritional knowledge questionnaire that included a quiz and questions about their main sources of nutrition information. Heights and body masses were also recorded. The linemen submitted written 3-day diet records for assessment of their dietary intake. Of the 88 participants, >50% reported consuming starches/grains, meat and dairy daily, but <50% reported consuming fruits and vegetables daily. Protein powders were the most commonly used supplements (33% reported daily use). Compared to dietary recommendations, linemen consumed high amounts of total fat, saturated fat, dietary cholesterol, sodium, and potassium, but were low in carbohydrates, fiber, and essential fats. The mean nutrition knowledge quiz score for the 88 participants was 55.2%. Those who had taken a nutrition or health course in college scored significantly higher on the quiz than those who had not. Participants reported relying primarily on coaches, websites, and athletic trainers (ATs) for nutritional guidance; ATs were the most trusted source. DIII football players had dietary habits that may both mitigate and increase their risk of chronic diseases. These athletes have room to improve their nutrition knowledge. Their reliance on athletic team staff for nutrition guidance highlights the importance of nutrition education for both athletes and staff and the potential role of a registered dietitian nutritionist.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 221 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 221 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 50 23%
Student > Master 38 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 6%
Researcher 9 4%
Student > Postgraduate 9 4%
Other 31 14%
Unknown 70 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 45 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 13%
Sports and Recreations 29 13%
Unspecified 8 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Other 26 12%
Unknown 78 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2020.
All research outputs
#2,058,680
of 19,802,760 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#427
of 842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,503
of 281,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,802,760 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 51.0. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,125 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them