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Influences on patient satisfaction in healthcare centers: a semi-quantitative study over 5 years

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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105 Mendeley
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Title
Influences on patient satisfaction in healthcare centers: a semi-quantitative study over 5 years
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2307-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruth D. Thornton, Nicole Nurse, Laura Snavely, Stacey Hackett-Zahler, Kenice Frank, Robert A. DiTomasso

Abstract

Knowledge of ambulatory patients' satisfaction with clinic visits help improve communication and delivery of healthcare. The goal was to examine patient satisfaction in a primary care setting, identify how selected patient and physician setting and characteristics affected satisfaction, and determine if feedback provided to medical directors over time impacted patient satisfaction. A three-phase, semi-quantitative analysis was performed using anonymous, validated patient satisfaction surveys collected from 889 ambulatory outpatients in 6 healthcare centers over 5-years. Patients' responses to 21 questions were analyzed by principal components varimax rotated factor analysis. Three classifiable components emerged: Satisfaction with Physician, Availability/Convenience, and Orderly/Time. To study the effects of several independent variables (location of clinics, patients' and physicians' age, education level and duration at the clinic), data were subjected to multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA).. Changes in the healthcare centers over time were not significantly related to patient satisfaction. However, location of the center did affect satisfaction. Urban patients were more satisfied with their physicians than rural, and inner city patients were less satisfied than urban or rural on Availability/Convenience and less satisfied than urban patients on Orderly/Time. How long a patient attended a center most affected satisfaction, with patients attending >10 years more satisfied in all three components than those attending <1-5 years. Level of education affected patients' satisfaction only in the component Orderly/Time; patients without a high school education were significantly less satisfied than those with more. Patients in their 40's were significantly less satisfied in Availability/Convenience than those >60 years old. Patients were significantly more satisfied with their 30-40 year-old physicians compared with those over 60. On Orderly/Time, patients were more satisfied with physicians who were in their 50's than physicians >60. Improvement in patient satisfaction includes a need for immediate, specific feedback. Although Medical Directors received feedback yearly, we found no significant changes in patient satisfaction over time. Our results suggest that, to increase satisfaction, patients with lower education, those who are sicker, and those who are new to the center likely would benefit from additional high quality interactions with their physicians.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 11%
Researcher 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 23%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 5%
Computer Science 3 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 2%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 35 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2017.
All research outputs
#4,093,022
of 17,364,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,676
of 5,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,619
of 275,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,364,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,884 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,611 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.