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A pre-therapeutic coating for medical devices that prevents the attachment of Candida albicans

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials, May 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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17 Dimensions

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71 Mendeley
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Title
A pre-therapeutic coating for medical devices that prevents the attachment of Candida albicans
Published in
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12941-017-0215-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Diego Vargas-Blanco, Aung Lynn, Jonah Rosch, Rony Noreldin, Anthony Salerni, Christopher Lambert, Reeta P. Rao

Abstract

Hospital acquired fungal infections are defined as "never events"-medical errors that should never have happened. Systemic Candida albicans infections results in 30-50% mortality rates. Typically, adhesion to abiotic medical devices and implants initiates such infections. Efficient adhesion initiates formation of aggressive biofilms that are difficult to treat. Therefore, inhibitors of adhesion are important for drug development and likely to have a broad spectrum efficacy against many fungal pathogens. In this study we further the development of a small molecule, Filastatin, capable of preventing C. albicans adhesion. We explored the potential of Filastatin as a pre-therapeutic coating of a diverse range of biomaterials. Filastatin was applied on various biomaterials, specifically bioactive glass (cochlear implants, subcutaneous drug delivery devices and prosthetics); silicone (catheters and other implanted devices) and dental resin (dentures and dental implants). Adhesion to biomaterials was evaluated by direct visualization of wild type C. albicans or a non-adherent mutant edt1 (-/-) that were stained or fluorescently tagged. Strains grown overnight at 30 °C were harvested, allowed to attach to surfaces for 4 h and washed prior to visualization. The adhesion force of C. albicans cells attached to surfaces treated with Filastatin was measured using Atomic Force Microscopy. Effectiveness of Filastatin was also demonstrated under dynamic conditions using a flow cell bioreactor. The effect of Filastatin under microfluidic flow conditions was quantified using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Experiments were typically performed in triplicate. Treatment with Filastatin significantly inhibited the ability of C. albicans to adhere to bioactive glass (by 99.06%), silicone (by 77.27%), and dental resin (by 60.43%). Atomic force microcopy indicated that treatment with Filastatin decreased the adhesion force of C. albicans from 0.23 to 0.017 nN. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy in a microfluidic device that mimic physiological flow conditions in vivo showed lower impedance for C. albicans when treated with Filastatin as compared to untreated control cells, suggesting decreased attachment. The anti-adhesive properties were maintained when Filastatin was included in the preparation of silicone materials. We demonstrate that Filastatin treated medical devices prevented adhesion of Candida, thereby reducing nosocomial infections.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Student > Postgraduate 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 25%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Materials Science 3 4%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 18 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,349,406
of 11,337,680 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
#122
of 310 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,664
of 264,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
#7
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,337,680 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 310 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,730 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.