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Genes showing altered expression in the medial preoptic area in the highly social maternal phenotype are related to autism and other disorders with social deficits

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, January 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

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140 Mendeley
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Title
Genes showing altered expression in the medial preoptic area in the highly social maternal phenotype are related to autism and other disorders with social deficits
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2202-15-11
Pubmed ID
Authors

Terri M Driessen, Brian E Eisinger, Changjiu Zhao, Sharon A Stevenson, Michael C Saul, Stephen C Gammie

Abstract

The mother-child relationship is the most fundamental social bond in mammals, and previous studies indicate that the medial preoptic area (MPOA) contributes to this increase in sociability. It is possible that the same genes that lead to elevated sociability in one condition (the maternal state) might also be dysregulated in some disorders with social deficits (e.g. autism). In this study, we examined whether there was enrichment (greater than chance overlap) for social deficit disorder related genes in MPOA microarray results between virgin and postpartum female mice. We utilized microarrays to assess large scale gene expression changes in the MPOA of virgin and postpartum mice. The Modular Single Set Enrichment Test (MSET) was used to determine if mental health disorder related genes were enriched in significant microarray results. Additional resources, such as ToppCluster, NIH DAVID, and weighted co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) were used to analyze enrichment for specific gene clusters or indirect relationships between significant genes of interest. Finally, a subset of microarray results was validated using quantitative PCR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Unknown 137 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 11%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Researcher 11 8%
Other 27 19%
Unknown 24 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 40 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 13%
Neuroscience 15 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 9%
Social Sciences 8 6%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 30 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2014.
All research outputs
#13,083,146
of 21,358,901 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#566
of 1,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,249
of 347,746 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#48
of 135 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,358,901 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,210 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,746 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 135 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.