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Identification of EML4-ALK as an alternative fusion gene in epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Identification of EML4-ALK as an alternative fusion gene in epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13023-017-0647-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Quan Jiang, Han-Xing Tong, Ying-Yong Hou, Yong Zhang, Jing-Lei Li, Yu-Hong Zhou, Jing Xu, Jiong-Yuan Wang, Wei-Qi Lu, Quan Jiang, Han-Xing Tong, Ying-Yong Hou, Yong Zhang, Jing-Lei Li, Yu-Hong Zhou, Jing Xu, Jiong-Yuan Wang, Wei-Qi Lu

Abstract

Known as solid tumors of intermediate malignant potential, most inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) are treatable as long as the tumor is en-bloc resected. However, in some cases, the tumors have recurred and grown rapidly after successful surgery. Some of these tumors were classified as an epithelioid inflammatory myofibroblastic sarcoma (EIMS). Most previously reported EIMSs have been caused by RANBP2-ALK fusion gene. We herein report an EIMS case caused by an EML4-ALK fusion gene. RNAseq was conducted to find out the new ALK fusion gene which could not be detected following previously reported RT-PCR methods for EIMS cases with RANBP2-ALK fusion gene. After that, RT-PCR was also conducted to further prove the newly found fusion gene. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test were applied to find out the unique morphological characters compared with the previous reported EIMS cases. We found an EIMS case who was suffering from a rapid recurrence after cytoreducyive surgery was done to relieve the exacerbating symptoms. The patient finally died for tumor lysis syndrome after the application of crizotinib. Distinctive ALK staining under the membrane and relatively weak ALK staining in the cytoplasm could also be observed. RNAseq and RT-PCR further revealed that the tumor harbored an EML4-ALK fusion gene. In conclusion, this is the first EIMS demonstrated to have been caused by the formation of an EML4-ALK fusion gene. This enriches the spectrum of EIMS and enlarges the horizon for the study of EIMS. The experience we shared in managing this kind of disease by discussing aspects of its success and failure could be of great value for surgeons and pathologists.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Unspecified 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 39%
Unspecified 2 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Unknown 6 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2018.
All research outputs
#4,527,688
of 17,956,456 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#517
of 1,918 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#78,401
of 278,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,956,456 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,918 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,293 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.