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ROS-mediated activation of Drosophila larval nociceptor neurons by UVC irradiation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, January 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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45 Mendeley
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Title
ROS-mediated activation of Drosophila larval nociceptor neurons by UVC irradiation
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2202-15-14
Pubmed ID
Authors

Myung-Jun Kim, Wayne A Johnson

Abstract

The complex Drosophila larval peripheral nervous system, capable of monitoring sensory input from the external environment, includes a family of multiple dendritic (md) neurons with extensive dendritic arbors tiling the inner surface of the larval body wall. The class IV multiple dendritic (mdIV) neurons are the most complex with dendritic nerve endings forming direct intimate contacts with epithelial cells of the larval body wall. Functioning as polymodal mechanonociceptors with the ability to respond to both noxious mechanical stimulation and noxious heat, the mdIV neurons are also activated by nanomolar levels of the endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), H2O2. Although often associated with tissue damage related to oxidative stress, endogenous ROS have also been shown to function as signaling molecules at lower concentrations. The overall role of ROS in sensory signaling is poorly understood but the acutely sensitive response of mdIV neurons to ROS-mediated activation is consistent with a routine role in the regulation of mdIV neuronal activity. Larvae respond to short wavelength ultraviolet (UVC) light with an immediate and visual system-independent writhing and twisting of the body previously described as a nociceptive response. Molecular and cellular mechanisms mediating this response and potential relationships with ROS generation are not well understood. We have used the UVC-induced writhing response as a model for investigation of the proposed link between endogenous ROS production and mdIV neuron function in the larval body wall.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 7%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 41 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 22%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 18%
Neuroscience 7 16%
Psychology 3 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 5 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2014.
All research outputs
#1,722,759
of 3,632,140 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#240
of 568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,921
of 108,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#17
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,632,140 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 568 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 108,793 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.