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Costs and quality of life for prehabilitation and early rehabilitation after surgery of the lumbar spine

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, October 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
patent
1 patent

Citations

dimensions_citation
83 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
175 Mendeley
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Title
Costs and quality of life for prehabilitation and early rehabilitation after surgery of the lumbar spine
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, October 2008
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-8-209
Pubmed ID
Authors

Per Rotbøll Nielsen, Jakob Andreasen, Mikael Asmussen, Hanne Tønnesen

Abstract

During the recent years improved operation techniques and administrative procedures have been developed for early rehabilitation. At the same time preoperative lifestyle intervention (prehabilitation) has revealed a large potential for additional risk reduction. The aim was to assess the quality of life and to estimate the cost-effectiveness of standard care versus an integrated programme including prehabilitation and early rehabilitation. The analyses were based on the results from 60 patients undergoing lumbar fusion for degenerative lumbar disease; 28 patients were randomised to the integrated programme and 32 to the standard care programme. Data on cost and health related quality of life was collected preoperatively, during hospitalisation and postoperatively. The cost was estimated from multiplication of the resource consumption and price per unit. Overall there was no difference in health related quality of life scores. The patients from the integrated programme obtained their postoperative milestones sooner, returned to work and soaked less primary care after discharge. The integrated programme was 1,625 euros (direct costs 494 euros + indirect costs 1,131 euros) less costly per patient compared to the standard care programme. The integrated programme of prehabilitation and early rehabilitation in spine surgery is more cost-effective compared to standard care programme alone.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 175 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 170 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 19%
Researcher 29 17%
Other 19 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 11%
Student > Postgraduate 12 7%
Other 41 23%
Unknown 22 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 85 49%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Social Sciences 5 3%
Sports and Recreations 3 2%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 38 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2022.
All research outputs
#4,239,656
of 20,952,692 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,052
of 6,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,825
of 286,713 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,952,692 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,968 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,713 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.