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Fermented foods, microbiota, and mental health: ancient practice meets nutritional psychiatry

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 265)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
249 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
54 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
19 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
video
8 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
163 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
726 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Fermented foods, microbiota, and mental health: ancient practice meets nutritional psychiatry
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1880-6805-33-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eva M Selhub, Alan C Logan, Alison C Bested

Abstract

The purposeful application of fermentation in food and beverage preparation, as a means to provide palatability, nutritional value, preservative, and medicinal properties, is an ancient practice. Fermented foods and beverages continue to make a significant contribution to the overall patterns of traditional dietary practices. As our knowledge of the human microbiome increases, including its connection to mental health (for example, anxiety and depression), it is becoming increasingly clear that there are untold connections between our resident microbes and many aspects of physiology. Of relevance to this research are new findings concerning the ways in which fermentation alters dietary items pre-consumption, and in turn, the ways in which fermentation-enriched chemicals (for example, lactoferrin, bioactive peptides) and newly formed phytochemicals (for example, unique flavonoids) may act upon our own intestinal microbiota profile. Here, we argue that the consumption of fermented foods may be particularly relevant to the emerging research linking traditional dietary practices and positive mental health. The extent to which traditional dietary items may mitigate inflammation and oxidative stress may be controlled, at least to some degree, by microbiota. It is our contention that properly controlled fermentation may often amplify the specific nutrient and phytochemical content of foods, the ultimate value of which may associated with mental health; furthermore, we also argue that the microbes (for example, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria species) associated with fermented foods may also influence brain health via direct and indirect pathways.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 249 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 726 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 711 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 196 27%
Student > Master 116 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 90 12%
Researcher 73 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 37 5%
Other 102 14%
Unknown 112 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 152 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 135 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 70 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 60 8%
Psychology 44 6%
Other 129 18%
Unknown 136 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 504. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2022.
All research outputs
#40,305
of 22,557,175 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#5
of 265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#406
of 353,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,557,175 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 265 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 353,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.