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Sex-biased chromatin and regulatory cross-talk between sex chromosomes, autosomes, and mitochondria

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, January 2014
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61 Mendeley
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Title
Sex-biased chromatin and regulatory cross-talk between sex chromosomes, autosomes, and mitochondria
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/2042-6410-5-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine Silkaitis, Bernardo Lemos

Abstract

Several autoimmune and neurological diseases exhibit a sex bias, but discerning the causes and mechanisms of these biases has been challenging. Sex differences begin to manifest themselves in early embryonic development, and gonadal differentiation further bifurcates the male and female phenotypes. Even at this early stage, however, there is evidence that males and females respond to environmental stimuli differently, and the divergent phenotypic responses may have consequences later in life. The effect of prenatal nutrient restriction illustrates this point, as adult women exposed to prenatal restrictions exhibited increased risk factors of cardiovascular disease, while men exposed to the same condition did not. Recent research has examined the roles of sex-specific genes, hormones, chromosomes, and the interactions among them in mediating sex-biased phenotypes. Such research has identified testosterone, for example, as a possible protective agent against autoimmune disorders and an XX chromosome complement as a susceptibility factor in murine models of lupus and multiple sclerosis. Sex-biased chromatin is an additional and likely important component. Research suggesting a role for X and Y chromosome heterochromatin in regulating epigenetic states of autosomes has highlighted unorthodox mechanisms of gene regulation. The crosstalk between the Y chromosomes and autosomes may be further mediated by the mitochondria. The organelles have solely maternal transmission and exert differential effects on males and females. Altogether, research supports the notion that the interaction between sex-biased elements might exert novel regulatory functions in the genome and contribute to sex-specific susceptibilities to autoimmune and neurological diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 59 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 11%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2014.
All research outputs
#10,918,919
of 13,734,991 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#218
of 253 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,538
of 245,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,734,991 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 253 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,883 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.