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Medical students’ career choices, preference for placement, and attitudes towards the role of medical instruction in Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, May 2017
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1 tweeter

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63 Mendeley
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Title
Medical students’ career choices, preference for placement, and attitudes towards the role of medical instruction in Ethiopia
Published in
BMC Medical Education, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12909-017-0934-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tsion Assefa, Damen Haile Mariam, Wubegzier Mekonnen, Miliard Derbew

Abstract

In Ethiopia, the health care delivery and the system of medical education have been expanding rapidly. However, in spite of the expansion, no studies have been carried out among medical students to identify their career choices and attitudes towards the medical instruction. Therefore, this study aimed to fill the gap in evidence in these specific areas. Pretested questionnaire was self-administered among fifth and sixth year medical students in six government owned medical schools in Ethiopia. A total of 959 students were involved in the study with a response rate of 82.2%. Career choices, intention where to work just after graduation, and attitudes towards medical instruction were descriptively presented. Binary logistic regression model was fitted to identify factors associated with the intention of medical students to work in rural and remote areas. Majority, (70.1%) of the medical students wanted to practice in clinical care settings. However, only a small proportion of them showed interest to work in rural and remote areas (21% in zonal and 8.7% in district/small towns). For most, internal medicine was the first specialty of choice followed by surgery. However, students showed little interest in obstetrics and gynecology, as well as in pediatrics and child health as their first specialty of choice. Medical students' attitudes towards their school in preparing them to work in rural and remote areas, to pursue their career within the country and to specialize in medical disciplines in which there are shortages in the country were low. The binary logistic regression model revealed that a significantly increased odds of preference to work in rural and remote areas was observed among males, those who were born in rural areas, the medical students of Addis Ababa University and those who had the desire to serve within the country. This study showed that Ethiopian medical schools are training medical workforce with preferences not to work in rural and remote places, and not to specialize in disciplines where there are shortages in the country. Thus, attention should be given to influence medical students' attitude to work in rural and remote locations and to specialize in diverse clinical specialties.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 10 16%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 14 22%
Unknown 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 20 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2017.
All research outputs
#9,896,705
of 11,174,763 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,360
of 1,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,032
of 266,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#45
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,174,763 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,485 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.