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Weather and children’s physical activity; how and why do relationships vary between countries?

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
50 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
140 Mendeley
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Title
Weather and children’s physical activity; how and why do relationships vary between countries?
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0526-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Flo Harrison, Anna Goodman, Esther M. F. van Sluijs, Lars Bo Andersen, Greet Cardon, Rachel Davey, Kathleen F Janz, Susi Kriemler, Lynn Molloy, Angie S Page, Russ Pate, Jardena J Puder, Luis B Sardinha, Anna Timperio, Niels Wedderkopp, Andy P. Jones

Abstract

Globally most children do not engage in enough physical activity. Day length and weather conditions have been identified as determinants of physical activity, although how they may be overcome as barriers is not clear. We aim to examine if and how relationships between children's physical activity and weather and day length vary between countries and identify settings in which children were better able to maintain activity levels given the weather conditions they experienced. In this repeated measures study, we used data from 23,451 participants in the International Children's Accelerometry Database (ICAD). Daily accelerometer-measured physical activity (counts per minute; cpm) was matched to local weather conditions and the relationships assessed using multilevel regression models. Multilevel models accounted for clustering of days within occasions within children within study-cities, and allowed us to explore if and how the relationships between weather variables and physical activity differ by setting. Increased precipitation and wind speed were associated with decreased cpm while better visibility and more hours of daylight were associated with increased cpm. Models indicated that increases in these variables resulted in average changes in mean cpm of 7.6/h of day length, -13.2/cm precipitation, 10.3/10 km visibility and -10.3/10kph wind speed (all p < 0.01). Temperature showed a cubic relationship with cpm, although between 0 and 20 degrees C the relationship was broadly linear. Age showed interactions with temperature and precipitation, with the associations larger among younger children. In terms of geographic trends, participants from Northern European countries and Melbourne, Australia were the most active, and also better maintained their activity levels given the weather conditions they experienced compared to those in the US and Western Europe. We found variation in the relationship between weather conditions and physical activity between ICAD studies and settings. Children in Northern Europe and Melbourne, Australia were not only more active on average, but also more active given the weather conditions they experienced. Future work should consider strategies to mitigate the impacts of weather conditions, especially among young children, and interventions involving changes to the physical environment should consider how they will operate in different weather conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 140 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 18%
Researcher 22 16%
Student > Master 20 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 9%
Student > Bachelor 9 6%
Other 18 13%
Unknown 34 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 31 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 11%
Social Sciences 13 9%
Psychology 8 6%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 42 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2019.
All research outputs
#796,449
of 19,521,967 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#314
of 1,767 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,213
of 284,348 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,521,967 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,767 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,348 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them