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A diet change from dry food to beef induces reversible changes on the faecal microbiota in healthy, adult client-owned dogs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
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Title
A diet change from dry food to beef induces reversible changes on the faecal microbiota in healthy, adult client-owned dogs
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-1073-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristin M. V. Herstad, Karina Gajardo, Anne Marie Bakke, Lars Moe, Jane Ludvigsen, Knut Rudi, Ida Rud, Monika Sekelja, Ellen Skancke

Abstract

Diet has a major influence on the composition of the gut microbiota, whose importance for gut health and overall well-being is increasingly recognized. Knowledge is limited regarding health implications, including effects on the faecal microbiota, of feeding a diet with high content of red meat to dogs, despite some owners' apparent preference to do so. The aim of this study was to evaluate how a diet change from commercial dry food to one with a high content of boiled minced beef and vice versa influenced the faecal microbiota, and short chain fatty acid profile in healthy, adult, client-owned dogs. The diet change influenced the faecal microbiota composition and diversity (Shannon diversity index). The most abundant OTUs in samples of dogs fed the dry food and high minced beef were affiliated with the species Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Clostridia hiranonis respectively. The high minced beef diet apparently also influenced the short chain fatty acid profile, with increased isovaleric acid, as well as an increase in faecal pH. These effects were reversed when the commercial dry food was reintroduced in weeks 6 and 7. Results of this study can aid in the understanding of how diet changes influence the faecal microbiota and metabolite content on a short-term basis. Long-term studies are required to investigate potential implications for canine gut and general health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 110 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 18%
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 12%
Other 6 5%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 27 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 32 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 30 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2017.
All research outputs
#2,699,219
of 19,293,994 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#168
of 2,665 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,239
of 283,154 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#1
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,293,994 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,665 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,154 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.