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Increased fragility fracture risk in Korean women who snore: a 10-year population-based prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Increased fragility fracture risk in Korean women who snore: a 10-year population-based prospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1587-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Soo Beom Choi, Il Suk Lyu, Wanhyung Lee, Deok Won Kim

Abstract

Snoring is frequently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Previous studies have shown that bone mineral density was significantly lower in patients with OSA than in controls; however, these studies did not focus on fractures. Fragility fractures can lead to long-term disabilities and a decrease in quality of life. The present study aimed to investigate the association between snoring and fragility fractures. This study included 2969 men and 3220 women aged 40 years and older from the Ansung and Ansan cohort studies in Korea. During a 10-year follow-up period, 129 and 273 fracture cases were reported in men and women, respectively. Severe snoring (6-7 nights per week or sleep disturbance by snoring in the next room) was a statistically significant risk factor for fracture (p = 0.006, hazard ratio 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.43) after adjusting for covariates related to fragility fracture in women. However, both snoring and severe snoring groups did not show significant associations with the fracture risk in men. Thus, information on the frequency of snoring in women may improve the accuracy of fragility fracture risk prediction, which can help in deciding whether intervention or treatment is necessary.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Lecturer 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Other 4 22%
Unknown 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 28%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,101,254
of 11,340,339 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,057
of 2,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,524
of 266,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#33
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,340,339 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,325 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,981 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.