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Sex-dependent effects of maternal corticosterone and SSRI treatment on hippocampal neurogenesis across development

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, June 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

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17 tweeters

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16 Dimensions

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Sex-dependent effects of maternal corticosterone and SSRI treatment on hippocampal neurogenesis across development
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13293-017-0142-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aarthi R. Gobinath, Joanna L. Workman, Carmen Chow, Stephanie E. Lieblich, Liisa A. M. Galea

Abstract

Postpartum depression affects approximately 15% of mothers and represents a form of early life adversity for developing offspring. Postpartum depression can be treated with prescription antidepressants like fluoxetine (FLX). However, FLX can remain active in breast milk, raising concerns about the consequences of neonatal FLX exposure. The hippocampus is highly sensitive to developmental stress, and males and females respond differently to stress at many endpoints, including hippocampal plasticity. However, it is unclear how developmental exposure to FLX alters the trajectory of hippocampal development. The goal of this study was to examine the long-term effects of maternal postpartum corticosterone (CORT, a model of postpartum depression) and concurrent FLX on hippocampal neurogenesis in male and female offspring. Female Sprague-Dawley rat dams were treated daily with either CORT or oil and FLX or saline from postpartum days 2-23. Offspring were perfused on postnatal day 31 (pre-adolescent), postnatal day 42 (adolescent), and postnatal day 69 (adult). Tissue was processed for doublecortin (DCX), an endogenous marker of immature neurons, in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Maternal postpartum CORT reduced density of DCX-expressing cells in the dorsal hippocampus of pre-adolescent males and increased it in adolescent males, suggesting that postpartum CORT exposure disrupted the typical progression of the density of DCX-expressing cells. Further, among offspring of oil-treated dams, pre-adolescent males had greater density of DCX-expressing cells than pre-adolescent females, and maternal postpartum CORT prevented this sex difference. In pre-adolescent females, maternal postpartum FLX decreased the density of DCX-expressing cells in the dorsal hippocampus compared to saline. As expected, maternal CORT reduced the density of DCX-expressing cells in adult female, but not male, offspring. The combination of maternal postpartum CORT/FLX diminished density of DCX-expressing cells in dorsal hippocampus regardless of sex or age. These findings reveal how modeling treatment of postpartum depression with FLX alters hippocampal neurogenesis in developing offspring differently depending on sex, predominantly in the dorsal dentate gyrus and earlier in life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 23%
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 15 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 15 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 12%
Psychology 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 21 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2017.
All research outputs
#2,884,932
of 18,846,561 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#108
of 373 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,167
of 281,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,846,561 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 373 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,990 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them