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Effects of infant weight gain on subsequent allergic outcomes in the first 3 years of life

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, June 2017
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Title
Effects of infant weight gain on subsequent allergic outcomes in the first 3 years of life
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12887-017-0890-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evelyn Xiu-Ling Loo, Anne Goh, Izzuddin Bin Mohd Aris, Oon Hoe Teoh, Lynette Pei-Chi Shek, Bee Wah Lee, Yiong Huak Chan, Mya Thway Tint, Shu-E Soh, Seang-Mei Saw, Peter Gluckman, Keith M Godfrey, Yap-Seng Chong, Fabian Yap, Michael S Kramer, Hugo Van Bever, Yung Seng Lee

Abstract

The association between early weight gain and later allergic outcomes has not been well studied. We examined the relation between weight gain and the subsequent development of allergic outcomes in the first 36 months of life in a Singapore birth cohort. In repeated visits in the first 15 months, we measured infant weight and administered questionnaires ascertaining allergic outcomes. At ages 18 and 36 months, we administered skin prick tests (SPTs) to inhalant and food allergens. At 18 months, 13.5% had a positive SPT, 3.5% had wheeze and a positive SPT, 3.9% had rhinitis and a positive SPT, and 6.1% had eczema and a positive SPT. Higher weight gain from 6 to 9 months, 9 to 12 months and 12 to 15 months were independently associated with a reduced risk of developing a positive SPT at 18 months (p-trend ≤0.03). At 36 months, 23.5% had a positive SPT, 11.9% had wheeze and a positive SPT, 12.2% rhinitis and a positive SPT, and 11.5% eczema and a positive SPT. Higher weight gain from 12 to 15 months was associated with a reduced risk of developing a positive SPT at 36 months (p-trend <0.01). No significant associations were observed between weight gain in any period and wheeze, rhinitis or eczema combined with a positive SPT at 18 or 36 months. Higher weight gain in the first 15 months of life was associated with a reduced risk of allergen sensitization, but not with combinations of allergic symptoms. NCT01174875 Registered 1 July 2010, retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Master 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,002,454
of 11,275,700 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#811
of 1,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,636
of 267,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#20
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,275,700 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,488 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.